Monday, April 16, 2007

CIL 2007: Gaming & Libraries - Engaging Strategies

Jenny Levine, ALA

average age of gamers is now 33, middle aged women largest % of online gamers

wii allows physically challenged to play games often for first time

super monkey ball - {looks kinda cool}

cultural issues in interacting w/ gamers - understand lingo etc

engaging gamers in library: collections (easy)/ support culture of gamers (game night - can include video and old school games)

orange county lib sys
- lots of cool game stuff, let kids review games on website {ocls rocks!}

gaming as readers advisory tool: ask kids what games they like and match genres up to book genres

geocaching

kids love ddr! {cool pic of older kid and younger kid playing ddr together} open play

gaming blog - aadl=good, very popular w/ lots of comments

stepmania

Orange County has game pods where kids can come in and play in library

sponsor gaming tournaments - big hits lots of places (public libs, uiuc), ninja tag night at ga tech

gaming as info lit tool: unc-greensboro, arizona state game project

teaching how to make games: gwinnett county pl has taught classes

confronting the challenges to participatory culture (pdf) - good report

think about demographic groups other than teens in planning gaming

brain age

gaming in libraries provides communal experience that gamers can't get at home

{can't really hear questions, but seems like a little antagonism towards gaming in libs, not "real" service. ridiculous! providing a service to library community and gets people in the door. they might find a book or 2 they like if you want to connect it to "real" services}

1 Comments:

At 2:15 PM, Blogger DBQ Hams said...

David,

I agree with your comment:
"but seems like a little antagonism towards gaming in libs, not "real" service. ridiculous!"

How many public libraries have a book as their highest circulation item? My local public library has DVDs as their highest item, and I'm betting they are not alone.

Although, I'm of the belief that games can offer just as strong of a narrative (potential more given the additional player involvement) as film. And as an educator, I believe there is a lot that can and is learned from games.

Paul

 

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